SATELLITE April - July 25 2015 1700 L St. NW Washington DC 8' h x 12' l x 8' w . plywood 3' x 3' blue square Inspired by and modeled after Early Bird, the first geosynchronous satellite launched into orbit in 1965.  Sculpture was built in a vacant downtown storefront.  Collaborative event programing ranged from weekly Lunch sessions, readings, performance, video events, and waffle breakfast.  This project was supported in part by the Lenkin Company

SATELLITE
April - July 25 2015
1700 L St. NW Washington DC
8' h x 12' l x 8' w . plywood
3' x 3' blue square

Inspired by and modeled after Early Bird, the first geosynchronous satellite launched into orbit in 1965.  Sculpture was built in a vacant downtown storefront.  Collaborative event programing ranged from weekly Lunch sessions, readings, performance, video events, and waffle breakfast. 
This project was supported in part by the Lenkin Company

In Monrovia, in collaboration with the Quilters Guilds, Waste Not Inc., Alice Bracewell (Sinkor), Quageh, Maude Davis (Caldwell), and  team of young women created a visual document of Story in an edition of Quilts.

In Monrovia, in collaboration with the Quilters Guilds, Waste Not Inc., Alice Bracewell (Sinkor), Quageh, Maude Davis (Caldwell), and  team of young women created a visual document of Story in an edition of Quilts.

AN EVENING OF SWING POETRY Thursday July 21 A group of DC poets take over the installation of Swing for a lively and informal reading.  Jessica Cebra & Casey Smith  Katy Bohinc & Adam Marston Kady Ashcraft & Jim Beane  Emilia Olsen & Christopher Cunningham Organized by Casey Smith PHD, visual-vocal artist Faculty in Arts and Humanities Corcoran College of Art + Design, Washington, DC.

AN EVENING OF SWING POETRY
Thursday July 21
A group of DC poets take over the installation of Swing for a lively and informal reading.  
Jessica Cebra & Casey Smith 
Katy Bohinc & Adam Marston
Kady Ashcraft & Jim Beane
 
Emilia Olsen & Christopher Cunningham

Organized by
Casey Smith PHD, visual-vocal artist
Faculty in Arts and Humanities
Corcoran College of Art + Design, Washington, DC.

Workingman Collective


Based in Washington, D.C. and Western North Carolina, Workingman Collective is a collaborative group of artists and range of professionals who move in and out of various projects.  An interest in exploring the nature of collaboration and cooperation, invention, chance, and the public guides their practice.  Projects move through stages from the collection of information to the construction of an object or situation to the participation of an audience.  Typically participation alters the process, producing new information that is integrated into the art experience. Ultimately, their projects seek to generate environmental awareness, stimulate the re-identification of a population with its hometown history, and urge participants into strengthening relationships with their neighbors.

Since its founding in 2005, Workingman Collective has exhibited work and created projects in the U.S., Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. They are represented by Hemphill Fine Arts, Washington DC.

From a Washington Post review by Mark Jenkins:

Americans’ perspective on nature has changed since 1924 so, of course, the collective is interested in environmentalism as well as expeditions. One of the show’s biggest pieces, titled “Swing,” is just that. But the swaying two-sided bench, suspended from a steel frame, is arrayed with house plants that remove volatile organic compounds from the air. Those plants are watered from a rain barrel the artists placed in the alley behind the gallery building, attached to the gutters to collect precipitation that would otherwise flow into the local sewer system. The group’s members are college-level art teachers — Goodman at the Corcoran, Ashcraft and Winant at George Mason University — with expertise in sculpture, drawing and printmaking. Yet they’re also experienced carpenters and contractors with an affinity for woodworking. “We made everything here,” Winant says. Although sometimes making means repurposing: The rain barrel is a 55-gallon syrup container from a nearby Pepsi plant. In a way, Workingman Collective is a build/design firm without a client. Perhaps that’s why its members seek collaborations with outsiders, including friends, kindred spirits and the potential collector who gets a consultation as part of the art.

The group’s motto is “your ideas are ours,” which Winant calls “a comment on the conceit of originality.”

Founding members are Tom Ashcraft, Peter Winant, Janis Goodman.

For more information click HERE