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REVOLVE SOUND FOURTEEN

Shane Parish + Tatsuya Nakatani

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Join us for this sure to be talked about show in the intimate setting of REVOLVE's listening room. The perfect way to segue from Thanksgiving dinner talk into the new week!

REVOLVE SOUND FOURTEEN
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Ahleuchatistas guitarist Shane Parish joins the legendary percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani for a series of duets that are as perplexing as they are beautiful. Sticking largely to fingerstyle acoustic guitar, Parish’s controlled and tightly parameterized improvising stands in stark contrast to Nakatani’s varied and unpredictable sound experiments. While his playing in the Ahleuchatistas is highly electric and aggressive, here, Parish seems almost meditative. Taking cues from artists such as John Fahey, Robbie Basho, and Jack Rose, he weaves a rich and unending tapestry of harmonic variety around Nakatani’s radical sound craft. An innovator in the art of bowed metals-gongs, cymbals and such- Nakatani’s work on Anatomy of a Moment only occasionally resembles percussion-as-we-know-it. The method in the pair’s madness is the juxtaposition of two wildly different approaches to improvisation. 

Throughout much of this album, Nakatani’s sounds take on a chaotic, almost industrial vibe and stand out in sharp opposition to Parish’s delicate and largely tonal arpeggios. On several tracks, however, Nakatani’s percussion seems to run in a path parallel to Parish’s guitar. “Long Walk Into Night” starts the album off on a spacey psychedelic vibe. Here, Nakatani’s bowed metals hover and shimmer over Parish’s lovely acoustic ruminations, sounding almost like highly distorted  chords. “Dolorous Duenna” revisits the same territory, though the piece’s slow, deliberate pace imparts a spooky, ominous feeling to the pair’s interaction. Parish switches to electric on two tracks: “Last Night Now” and “Century Seconds.” The latter features some of Nakatani’s most overtly rhythmic work, and sounds like a long-forgotten sound experiment by Can or Faust. Parish hammers and strums his electric on “Last Night Now,” achieving a vaguely Middle Eastern atmosphere, while Nakatani’s drumkit marches resignedly alongside. The overall effect of this piece is similar to the Sun City Girls’ improvisational forays. 

The utter brilliance of Anatomy of a Moment is a testament to both musicians’ skills as both players and listeners. Striking in both its originality and its daring approach to duet improvisation, it’s safe to say that there’s nothing else quite like it. 5/5 stars
— Dave Wayne, All About Jazz

 

 

Earlier Event: November 21
REVOLVE SOUND THIRTEEN
Later Event: December 2
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